March 19, An Apple’s Way Of Life

*Every day Is comes home from school and has a snack, then does her homework, then she can play or do whatever she likes. Today, I was cutting up apples for her snack (she requested apples with peanut butter and some popcorn), when I noticed that the apple had a scar. Isobel had two long scars on her leg from previous hip surgeries- one along the bikini line from several open reductions, and one on her outer thigh from a femoral osteotomy and subsequent hardware removal. Most of the time she’s fine with her scars, but sometimes she doesn’t like them. I told her that scars are just a way that you can see how strong you are- that you were stronger than whatever gave you that scar, and now you’re healed. So I pointed out the apple’s scar.*

“Hey, Is, look at this apple- it has a scar!”
She looks. “Just like me!”
“That’s right.”
“Huh.”
“I’ll be done making your snack in a minute.”
“Should we eat it?”
“Sure, it’s fine. It’s just a spot where the apple rested on a branch or something, that’s why there’s a scar in the skin.”
“So it didn’t do anything to get the scar?”
“No, I don’t think apples don’t do much except grow, right?”
She smiles and leaves the room to put her homework on her desk. From the other room she calls to me, “Hey, apples don’t even have a way of life!”

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February 13, 2018, Going Swimming

*Isobel’s taken swimming lessons since she was eighteen months old. There are few things she loves more than being in the water. And she’s fearless; she’ll just as happily jump off the starting block into the deep end (9 feet!) and swim in the lap pool as in the smaller, warmer, more shallow therapy pool. I originally started swimming with her to try and build up her core muscles after the spica casts treating her hip dysplasia left her abdominal, back, and leg muscles weak. But she loves it so much, we’ve kept up with it. She goes once a week. This week, she had some new questions…*

*Putting on her suit, right before her lesson*

“Hey, Mom.”
“Yeah? Let’s move it, we’re gonna be late.”
“How come girls have to cover our boobs in the pool? Boys can just wear bottoms, but girls have tops and bottoms. Why is that?”

*Since we have two minutes to get Is into the pool, and I really don’t want to explain the sexualization of women’s breasts to my six-year-old, I go blank for a second.*

“Mom?”
“Uh. Yes. Yes! Okay, well, you know how everybody has private parts, right? And you keep those covered up in public?”
“Yeah.”
“Okay, so girls have extra private parts.”
“Really?”
“Yes. We win for private parts. We have more than boys.”
“WOW!”
“I know! Let’s get going.”
“Mom, I have tiny boobs.”
“They’re perfect, baby. Let’s plow.”

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December 16, 2015

Isobel has hip dysplasia. She was born with it, and so was I. We’ve both had multiple surgeries, casts, braces, and therapy to help fix our hips. Isobel’s hip was finally fixed this year. It took eight surgeries, the resolute efforts of a highly skilled surgeon and his team, nearly 11 months of spica casts, many days in the hospital, multiple braces, and countless hours of physical therapy. I’ve written an essay about her journey (and mine) in a new book that’s been published this week, “Onward! Navigating Hip Dysplasia, PAO Surgery, and Beyond”.

I am grateful to Jen Lesea-Ames, for her beautiful strength, dedication, and passion for her project. I believe her book will change so many lives for the better- people who thought they were alone in their struggles with hip dysplasia will find that they are not- and that there’s a community of people who understand and empathize. It’s a powerful thing, empathy. She’s connecting people and creating a brand new support system for all of us. Thank you, Jen.

Here’s a link to Jen’s PAO Project website: http://thepaoproject.com/

Here’s a link to the book on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/dp/0692585206

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